Productivity

Productivity

Many people who wish to persue a polyphasic sleep schedule do it for the productivity benefits that polyphasic sleep provides. As can be seen in the 2018 polyphasic survey results and analysis, many people improved their productivity naturally just by being on a polyphasic schedule! This could perhaps be due to the similarity between polyphasic sleep schedules and the pomodory technique, since both force people to structure ther lives in a predictable and strict manner. The purpose of this page is to provide further resources related to productivity.

Less is More: Polyphasic Sleeping & The Pareto Principle

Less is More: Polyphasic Sleeping & The Pareto Principle

Vilfredo Damaso Pareto was known for the widely applied “80-20” principle in various fields (e.g, economics, wealth distribution, equality, and even in nature). This principle originally suggested that “20% of Europe’s population now owned 80% of its wealth”2. This inequality in outcome was then derived and interpreted in many different ways. The Pareto principle is the approximation that 20% of the causes often result in 80% of the effects.

This blog will attempt to explain polyphasic sleep’s overall mechanics with the Pareto principle and how polyphasic sleepers can learn to improve their productivity by applying this principle in their daily and long-term objectives. However, more research about polyphasic sleeping’s mechanisms is necessary to fully determine whether it is a healthy and long-lasting example of the Pareto principle.

The Eisenhower Matrix: A Motivation Booster for Polyphasic Sleep

The Eisenhower Matrix: A Motivation Booster for Polyphasic Sleep

The Eisenhower Matrix is designed to be a time-management system of decision making and prioritization that helps learners make the most accurate decisions to determine the importance of various tasks that need to be completed. By actively planning to complete each task based on their relevance, urgency and importance, one can learn to formulate thought processes that smoothen personal objectives. This can be effectively done through the use of certain markers such as deadlines, short-term vs long-term goals to comprehensively develop corresponding strategies. Each assessment of targeted tasks or duties can also be used to fight off procrastination by boosting personal motivation in achieving different goals, no matter how simple they may be…

A Method to Sleep Polyphasically Without Alarm Clocks

A Method to Sleep Polyphasically Without Alarm Clocks

One important question is whether it is possible to sleep without alarm clocks while on a polyphasic schedule and successfully adapt. With all the analysis of the mechanics of cortisol secretion pattern and cortisol awakening response (CAR), it then becomes necessary to pose a question: Can polyphasic sleepers manipulate/abuse cortisol secretion mechanics to help prevent oversleeping during adaptation and possibly enable them to sleep without alarms during and after the adaptation phase? To answer these questions, it is necessary to understand that cortisol might not be a sufficient method to “will” oneself to wake up around the time alarm goes off or any time they want (regardless of sleep duration). And to what extent can this mechanics be abused requires more research on certain processes in the human body that are involved with sleep-wake control under polyphasic sleeping conditions…

Maintaining Polyphasic Schedules After Adaptation Phase

Maintaining Polyphasic Schedules After Adaptation Phase

Napping behavior is not fully explained by science, but learning to strategically nap is key to maintaining a polyphasic pattern, to not waste away all the napping skills that sleepers have acquired. In order to take advantage of these sleeping strategies, it is recommended that these napping methods in this page be carried out only after the adaptation process is completed. If done during adaptation, this will set back the adaptation progress when sleep times are different from the designed schedule. However, in return napping outside of the schedule may prevent a bigger oversleep later on from skipping the previous sleep(s); this comes down to personal choice, but skipping sleep is still generally a better option to avoid affecting the sleep onset of the next sleep in a negative way…

Sleep Inertia: An In-Depth Analysis

Sleep Inertia: An In-Depth Analysis

Sleep inertia is a very common sleep phenomenon in humans and is defined as a period of impaired alertness upon awakening from sleep (including both core sleeps and naps). Whether the sleep pattern is monophasic or polyphasic, sleep inertia can occur in a seemingly random pattern; its degree of severity and effects also vary depending on different contributing factors. Concerns about how sleep inertia affects performance on different tasks (physical or cognitive) are also raised. There are a lot of questions to be answered about sleep inertia mechanics as well as any reliably absolute solutions that can effectively shut it down. Is sleep inertia an entirely negative aspect of sleep? Is it dangerous? Do homeostatic and circadian pressures have anything to do with it and is it wrong to live with mild levels of inertia on a daily basis? This blog post will serve to break down all related factors that can make sleep inertia worse or better, and whether it is entirely possible to avoid sleep inertia…

Polyphasic Sleeping: A Macroscopic Vision of the Pomodoro Technique

Polyphasic Sleeping: A Macroscopic Vision of the Pomodoro Technique

The traditional Pomodoro Technique consists of a cyclic period of doing an activity for 25 minutes followed by a 5-minute break, making up several chunks of 30 minutes. After 4 Pomodoros, the break is proposed to be longer, anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes. Alternative Pomodoro variants include a longer period of activity followed up by a slightly longer break (e.g, 45  minutes of studying/working followed by a 10-minute break). The premise of this time-control technique is to train humans to focus on one task at hand and has been proven to be effective against procrastination. Taking a short break has been demonstrated to refresh the mind and carry a consistently high level of productivity into late periods in the day. More potential cautions regarding Pomodoro will be included in this blog post as well as how polyphasic sleeping is related to this technique. This blog post also details certain ways polyphasic sleepers can make use of Pomodoro and these ways can vary from person to person…

Daydreaming and polyphasic sleep

Daydreaming: An Underrated Threat to Polyphasic Sleep Adaptations

Daydreaming, also known as mind wandering, is a common phenomenon in humans’ daily life. Under normal conditions, it is usually harmless – it is usually moments of distraction from current tasks, similar to lost-in-thought moments. It is summed up as “a wide variety of spontaneous and undirected mentation”, and can account for up to 30-50% of thought-probe responses in laboratory and field studies. There appears to be some reciprocal correlation between the frequency of daydreaming and sleep quality, and even chronotype; however, it is still unclear how much sleep deprivation can affect the frequency of daydreaming, as well as whether daydreaming in return causes sleep deprivation (insomnia). In extreme cases, daydreaming can interfere with daily life on a global scale…

 NoFap and Polyphasic Sleep

NoFap and polyphasic sleep

The first month is likely going to be tremendously difficult to maintain, and will likely result in failure, due to the enormous change in lifestyle that it entails. Pornographic photos are also everywhere on the internet, which means that withdrawal symptoms from the addiction are going to be returning again and again. Withdrawing from a masturbation addiction invokes similar withdrawal symptoms to smoking, using drugs and stimulants, which means that strong mental barricades are going to need to be established to succeed. But most importantly, the whole process can be seen as a way of increasing one’s discipline…

Appetitive Napping

Appetitive Napping

This napping method is defined as napping even when not tired, but for psychological benefits such as restorative effects from napping. It is also done without any relation to sleep needs, but rather from napping as a routine. Because of the nature of this napping behavior, it is consensually agreed that short appetitive naps (~20 minutes) contain mostly NREM12  because of low sleep pressure, and is equivalent to a shuteye (under non-reducing biphasic conditions or normal monophasic sleepers casually taking a nap)…

Main author: Crimsonflwr

Page last updated: 29 June 2020